Colourful Clothing – Fashion Colours and Their Meanings

Throughout history, the colours of clothing that individuals wear convey special meanings or are worn to convey some form of personal expression. From ancient kings wearing purple, to Western brides wearing white, colourful clothing presents very clear statements about the wearer. Even fashion on a more subtle or subconscious level, the colour of one’s clothes can stimulate certain feelings or emotional responses in both the wearer and the observer. A reaction generated by responding to a fashion colour stems from a variety of psychological, biological, cultural and traditional factors. Below are some guidelines to colours in fashion, and what responses may be created from wearing them.

When choosing from a selection of colourful clothing, one’s eyes may first notice the colour red. Red is the most volatile and emotionally charged colour in the spectrum, and generally conveys heightened emotional responses, such as passion or power. Red also creates a biological response, by the quickening of the pulse and increased rates of respiration. Use caution in certain circumstances when choosing clothes of red. A reddish hue creates an illusion of heaviness, increases appetite and can be interpreted as confrontational. Pink, on the other hand, is a very calming and placid colour. Wearing pink will portray a quality of innocence and romance, all the while relaxing the wearer. Purple depicts luxury, sovereignty and opulence. When wearing clothing made of purple, wearers present a sense of power.

Blue is one of the most common colours in fashion. Blue also calms and relaxes, and portrays a sense of comfort, as evidenced by the ever popular blue jean. Blue can also be construed as a sign of loyalty. Green is a refreshing colour, and is very easy to view. Dark green implies wealth and masculinity. In some cultures, green was worn to increase fertility. Some find the colour yellow to be the most difficult to view in colourful clothing. Although cheer and energy are generally associated with sunshine yellow, babies in yellow rooms cry more often, suggesting an irritating association with the colour. However, yellow does increase metabolism and stimulate concentration.